Methodist Church Disagrees With GES Directive To Wesley Girls High School To Allow Muslim Students Participate In Ramadan

Methodist Church Disagrees With GES Directive To Wesley Girls High School To Allow Muslim Students Participate In Ramadan

The Methodist Church Ghana has strongly expressed its displeasure and disagreement with the Ghana Education Service for directing Wesley Girls High School to allow Muslim students in the school to participate in the Ramadan fast.

In a statement released today May 4 2021, the church leaders expressed their dissatisfaction with the manner in which GES has decided to handle the matter unilaterally by issuing directives to the school to disregard its long-standing rule. The school’s rules, the church argues are what make it the school of choice, excellence and achievement.

car-ad

The GES had released a statement on May 1 2021, directing the school to allow students to fast and also asked parents of such students to write to the school assuring them that the consequence of the fasting of the students will not be borne by the school.

active-promo

However, the leadership of the church is taking exception to that and are assuring the school that the church stands by it and the rule which forbids students from fasting while in the school. The statement which was released after an emergency meeting held by the church today, 4th May 2021 and chaired by the Presiding Bishop, Most Rev Dr Paul Kwabena Boafo wants the school to continue to enforce its rules.

“The school rule in question is a long-standing one which is also non-religious and various renowned Muslim ladies in Ghana have passed through the school adhering to such a rule. The policies of the School over the 186 years of its existence have resulted in Wesley Girls High School being the school of Choice, Excellence and Achievement and the Church remains in full support of these policies,” parts of the statement read.

The statement by the Methodist Church Ghana
The statement by the Methodist Church Ghana

This recent case follows a recent tussle between Achimota School and Rastafarian students who were asked to cut down their dread before they could be admitted into the school following their placement to the school by the Computerized School Selection and Placement System.

By Clifford Adumbire | myactiveonline.com Twitter @adumbirec and @activetvgh

Leave a Reply